Winter Garden Theatre, (4/09/2015 - 7/05/2015)

First Preview: Mar 20, 2015
Opening Date: Apr 09, 2015
Closing Date: Jul 05, 2015
Total Previews: 21
Total Performances: 103

Category: Play, Original, Broadway
Comments: Part One ("Wolf Hall") played 12 previews and 53 performances; Part Two ("Bring Up the Bodies") played 9 previews and 50 performances.

Opening Night Production Staff

Theatre Owned / Operated by The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President)

Produced by Jeffrey Richards, Jerry Frankel, Matthew Byam Shaw, Nia Janis & Nick Salmon, Playful Productions UK, Carole Shorenstein Hays, Jam Theatricals, Ron Kastner, Kyodo Tokyo, Inc., Tulchin Bartner Productions, WLE MSG, Jane Bergère, Scott M. Delman, Rebecca Gold, Just For Laughs Theatricals, Kit Seidel, Triple Play Productions, Gabrielle Palitz, Georgia Gatti, Jessica Genick, Will Trice and The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President); Associate Producer: Steven Strauss

Originally produced by The Royal Shakespeare Company (Gregory Doran, Artistic Director; Catherine Mallyon, Executive Director)

By Hilary Mantel; Adapted by Mike Poulton; Music by Stephen Warbeck

Directed by Jeremy Herrin; Movement: Siân Williams; Associate Director: Joe Murphy; UK Assistant Director: Oonagh Murphy

Scenic Design by Christopher Oram; Costume Design by Christopher Oram; Lighting Designer Part 1: Paule Constable; Lighting Designer Part 2: David Plater; Sound Design by Nick Powell; Associate Scenic Design: Timothy R. Mackabee; Associate Lighting Design: Gina Scherr; Associate Sound Design: Christopher Cronin; Moving Light Programmer: Michael Hill

General Manager: James Triner Theatricals; Company Manager: Megan Curren

Production Manager: Aurora Productions; Production Stage Manager: Michael J. Passaro; UK Production Manager: Patrick Molony; Stage Manager: Pat Sosnow; Assistant Stage Mgr: Julie Baldauff

Stunt Coordinator: Christian Kelly-Sordelet; Dance Captain: Giles Taylor; Casting Director: Helena Palmer CDG; Press Representative: Jeffrey Richards Associates; Press Associate: Christopher Pineda; Advertising: AKA; Digital Marketing & Website: AKA; Social Media/Interactive Marketing Services: Broadway's Best Shows; Photographer: Jonah Persson

Opening Night Cast

Joey BateyMark Smeaton
a musician
Nicholas BoultonCharles Brandon
Duke of Suffolk, old friend of Henry VIII
Lucy BriersKatherine of Aragon
Henry's first wife
Jane Boleyn
Lady Rochford, George Boleyn's wife
Leah BrotherheadPrincess Mary
King Henry VIII and Katherine of Aragon's daughter
Jane Seymour
John's daughter/lady-in-waiting to Katherine, Anne
Lady Worcestor
lady-in-waiting
Olivia DarnleyLizzie Wykys
Thomas Cromwell's wife
Mary Boleyn
Anne Boleyn's sister and Henry's ex-mistress
Mary Shelton
lady-in-waiting
Nicholas DayThomas Howard
Duke of Norfolk, Anne's uncle
Mathew FosterEnsemble
Daniel FraserGregory Cromwell
Thomas Cromwell and Lizzie Wykys' son
Edward HarrisonGeorge Boleyn
Lord Rochford, Anne and Mary Boleyn's brother
Edward Seymour
Sir John Seymour's son
Benedict HastingsWolsey's Servant
Servant
Barge-Master
Madeleine HylandMargery Seymour
Sir John Seymour's wife
Lady-in-waiting
Maid
Paul JessonSir John Seymour
Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York
Cardinal, papal legate, Lord Chancellor
Archbishop Warham
aged Archbishop of Canterbury
Sir William Kingston
Constable of the Tower of London
Lydia LeonardAnne Boleyn
Henry's second wife
Robert MacphersonEnsemble
Ben MilesThomas Cromwell
a lawyer
Pierro Niel-MeeChristophe
a servant
Francis Weston
a gentleman attending to the King
Nathaniel ParkerKing Henry VIII
Matthew PidgeonStephen Gardiner, Master of Trinity Hall
Cardinal's secretary, Master Secretary to Henry
Eustache Chapuys
London ambassador of Emperor Charles V
John RammHenry Norris
a gentleman attending to the King
Thomas More
lawyer and scholar, later Lord Chancellor
Nicholas ShawHarry Percy
Earl of Northumberland
William Brereton
a gentleman attending to the King
Joshua SilverRafe Sadler
Cromwell's chief clerk
Giles TaylorThomas Boleyn
Anne and Mary Boleyn's father
Thomas Cranmer
Cambridge scholar, later Archbishop of Canterbury
French Ambassador
Jay TaylorThomas Wyatt
a gentleman and poet
Headsman

Understudies: Joey Batey (Headsman, Thomas Wyatt), Nicholas Boulton (King Henry VIII, Thomas Howard), Olivia Darnley (Jane Boleyn, Katherine of Aragon, Margery Seymour), Nicholas Day (Sir John Seymour), Mathew Foster (Barge-Master, Charles Brandon, Christophe, Francis Weston, Gregory Cromwell, Rafe Sadler, Sir William Kingston, Wolsey's Servant), Daniel Fraser (Edward Seymour, George Boleyn, Mark Smeaton), Edward Harrison (Thomas Cromwell), Benedict Hastings (Charles Brandon, Christophe, Francis Weston, Gregory Cromwell, Harry Percy, Rafe Sadler, William Brereton), Madeleine Hyland (Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Lady Worcestor, Lizzie Wykys, Mary Boleyn, Mary Shelton, Princess Mary), Robert Macpherson (Barge-Master, Eustache Chapuys, French Ambassador, Headsman, Stephen Gardiner, Master of Trinity Hall, Thomas Wyatt, Wolsey's Servant), Matthew Pidgeon (Henry Norris, Thomas More), Nicholas Shaw (Eustache Chapuys, Stephen Gardiner, Master of Trinity Hall), Giles Taylor (Archbishop Warham, Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York, Wolsey's Ghost) and Jay Taylor (Harry Percy, Thomas Boleyn, Thomas Cranmer, William Brereton)

Awards and Nominations

Tony Award®

 2015 Best Play [nominee] 

Based on Hilary Mantel; Book adapted by Mike Poulton; Produced by Jeffrey Richards, Jerry Frankel, Matthew Byam Shaw, Nia Janis & Nick Salmon, Playful Productions UK, Carole Shorenstein Hays, Jam Theatricals, Ron Kastner, Kyodo Tokyo, Inc., Tulchin Bartner Productions, WLE MSG, Jane Bergère, Scott M. Delman, Rebecca Gold, Just For Laughs Theatricals, Kit Seidel, Triple Play Productions, Gabrielle Palitz, Georgia Gatti, Jessica Genick, Will Trice and The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President); Originally produced by The Royal Shakespeare Company (Gregory Doran, Artistic Director; Catherine Mallyon, Executive Director)

 2015 Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play [nominee] 

Ben Miles

 2015 Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play [nominee] 

Nathaniel Parker

 2015 Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play [nominee] 

Lydia Leonard

 2015 Best Direction of a Play [nominee] 

Jeremy Herrin

 2015 Best Scenic Design of a Play [nominee] 

Christopher Oram

winner 2015 Best Costume Design of a Play [winner] 

Christopher Oram

 2015 Best Lighting Design of a Play [nominee] 

Paule Constable and David Plater

Drama Desk Award

 2015 Outstanding Actor in a Play [nominee] 

Ben Miles

 2015 Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play [nominee] 

Lydia Leonard

 2015 Outstanding Costume Design [nominee] 

Christopher Oram

 2015 Outstanding Lighting Design [nominee] 

Paule Constable

 2015 Outstanding Lighting Design [nominee] 

David Plater

 2015 Outstanding Director of a Play [nominee] 

Jeremy Herrin

Reviews


AP: "Clever, Cool 'Wolf Hall' on Broadway is Addictive"

Historian Hilary Mantel has said she was prompted to focus on Thomas Cromwell because history was treating his life's story like a black hole. We have now all seen the light.

Thanks to her books, "Wolf Hall" and "Bring Up the Bodies," Cromwell is now desperately cool. There's a six-hour miniseries airing in America and a two-play stage production that's made its way to Broadway. What's next? Perhaps the musical "Cromwell!"

If it's as good as the Royal Shakespeare Company's stunning, addictive and clever adaptation, bring it on. After six hours of "Part One" and "Part Two," there were impatient people leaving the Winter Garden Theatre waiting for "Part Three."

This is not the Cromwell many of us learned about in school. The martyr isn't Thomas More. It's Cardinal Wolsey. And the hero isn't Henry VIII but Cromwell, a blacksmith's son who rises through the ranks of the court to become chief adviser and fixer for the king.

"Part One" concentrates on the eight years from 1527 to 1535 as Cromwell grows in power and yet loses his patron, Wolsey. The second play focuses on a single year, 1535, when Anne Boleyn falls from Henry's graces, which leads to her execution the following year.

The acting is led by an indefatigable Ben Miles, whose Cromwell is watchful, patient and sardonic. We watch him maneuver through the alliances and court, protecting his king with skillful manipulations and even what could be considered inchoate press releases.

Nathaniel Parker as Henry VIII is riveting, at times needy or smitten and at others very, very dangerous. Lydia Leonard plays her Boleyn as entitled and arrogant, making her fall all that more painful.

Directed with blistering pace and guile by Jeremy Herrin, the Cromwell that emerges from these plays is less Machiavellian and more, well, superhero. "Do something, Cromwell!" more than one nobleman screams.

There's more than a little swagger in Cromwell's tunic, too. "Well you can't do anything about the weather, Tom," a character tells him. Replies Cromwell: "No, but I can change everything else."

The first part comes close to being force-fed history like a goose - but in a good way - via 30 scenes that change in a blink of an eye. Sometimes Miles simply takes a sharp right on the stage and we're in a new scene. Nothing is allowed to sit for very long as the tension builds.

In the second play, things slow down to a steady boil and Cromwell begins the tricky task of becoming a detective, gathering evidence to convict the queen. This part could be called "Prime Suspect: Tudor."

The lush costumes by Christopher Oram involve thick coats, suits of armor and glorious gowns, while Oram also built the striking, minimalist set, which adds fire - literally - against a grim backdrop that evokes England's St. George's cross. Two lighting designers - Paule Constable for "Part One" and David Plater in "Part Two" - wonderfully make these plays moody and intriguing.

Adapted by Mike Poulton, the two parts are connected by modern English, gallows humor, ghosts who chat with the living and by everyone complaining about the rain. One part alone stands by itself but this adaptation is like a bag of chips. Can you stop with just one?


AP
04/09/2015

New York Daily News: "'Wolf Hall Parts One and Two' review: History comes alive and heads roll on Broadway in this bold slice of English history"

What Henry VIII wants, Henry VIII gets. Guaranteeing that is Thomas Cromwell, the royal fixer at the center of the bracing Broadway double-header “Wolf Hall Parts One and Two.”

Adapted from Hilary Mantel’s best-sellers “Wolf Hall” and “Bring Up the Bodies,” the plays retrace 1500s political intrigue in Henry’s house of cards. The English history comes alive with crisp and plainspoken urgency.

Jeremy Herrin directs a crackerjack cast from the Royal Shakespeare Company in a spare production. Gray walls and shards of lighting set off jewel-toned and blood-stained period clothes. Above the bare stage hovers a crownlike iron gridwork.

Part One quickly establishes the central trouble: Henry (Nathaniel Parker, excellent) needs a son, born in wedlock, to succeed him. So he kicks aging Catherine of Aragon (Lucy Briers) the curb to wed the fertile Anne Boleyn (Lydia Leonard).

Cromwell suggests that Catherine join a convent. “You may tell the King that I will become a nun,” she says. A long beat, then she adds. “My one condition is that Henry must become a monk.” The show is shot through with sly parries and juicy jabs.

Part Two opens with Anne, wife number two, hunted by bowsmen in a chilling silent dreamlike prologue. She’d had Henry’s daughter, but no son, so she’s toast. Enter girlish Jane Seymour (Leah Brotherhead), who’ll become wife number three and have the son Henry desperately wants.

So many people already have more than a passing knowledge of Tudor England, thanks to countless retelling of this story in books, TV, film, and an opera. The familiarity can be a drawback; the pacing drags a bit because we’re awaiting the twist we know is coming. And the show could stand to fire more emotions.

But this excellent ensemble shines. Parker cuts an impressive presence as the much-married monarch. Leonard is fetching and fierce as Anne. Briers brings uncompromising grace and smarts as Catherine (spelled with a K by the production). Brotherhead adds vulnerability as Jane, a living pawn whose own father can’t recall her name.

But the production rides squarely on Cromwell, who rarely leaves the stage in five-plus hours. He’s a blacksmith’s son turned key power player, and the terrific Ben Miles expertly summons the man in full: his tenderness, humor and heartless ambition all in one.

Miles reigns in this court.


New York Daily News
04/09/2015

Replacement/Transfer Info


The following people are credited as replacements or additions if they were not credited on opening night.


Winter Garden Theatre

(4/9/2015 - 7/5/2015)

Cast

Peter Eyre
Archbishop Warham
aged Archbishop of Canterbury
Sir John Seymour
Sir William Kingston
Constable of the Tower of London
Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York
Cardinal, papal legate, Lord Chancellor


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