Lyceum Theatre, (10/23/2014 - 3/01/2015)

First Preview: Sep 27, 2014
Opening Date: Oct 23, 2014
Closing Date: Mar 01, 2015
Total Previews: 27
Total Performances: 149

Category: Play, Drama, Original, Broadway
Setting: 2011-2012. A spacious apartment on New York's Upper East Side.

Opening Night Production Staff

Theatre Owned / Operated by The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President)

Produced by The Araca Group, Lincoln Center Theater (André Bishop: Producing Artistic Director; Adam Siegel: Managing Director; Hattie K. Jutagir, Executive Director of Development and Planning), Jenifer Evans, Amanda Watkins, Richard Winkler, Rodger Hess, Stephanie P. McClelland, Tulchin Bartner Productions, Jessica Genick, Jonathan Reinis, Carl Levin/Ashley De Simone/TNTDynaMite Productions, Alden & Bergson/Rachel Weinstein, Greenleaf Productions, Darren DeVerna/Jere Harris, The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President) and David Merrick Arts Foundation; Associate Producer: Gregg Christenson

Written by Ayad Akhtar

Directed by Kimberly Senior; Assistant Director: Nate Silver

Scenic Design by John Lee Beatty; Costume Design by Jennifer von Mayrhauser; Lighting Design by Kenneth Posner; Sound Design by Jill B.C. Du Boff; Makeup & Special Effect Design: Angelina Avallone; Associate Scenic Design: Kacie Hultgren; Associate Costume Design: Leslie Bernstein; Associate Lighting Design: Paul Hackenmueller; Associate Sound Design: Dave Sanderson

Executive Producer: Marisa Sechrest; General Manager: Foresight Theatrical and Allan Williams; Company Manager: Edward Nelson

Technical Supervisor: Juniper Street Productions; Production Stage Manager: William Joseph Barnes; Stage Manager: Laurie Goldfeder

Casting: Caparelliotis Casting; Press Representative: Boneau / Bryan-Brown; Strategic Marketing: On the Rialto; Advertising: Serino Coyne; Interactive Marketing: Jim Glaub, Kevin Keating, Hailey Barton, Patrick Mediate and Jeff Miele; Fight direction by UnkleDave's Fight House and David Anzuelo; Assistant Fight Director: Jesse Geguzis; Photographer: Joan Marcus

Opening Night Cast

Hari Dhillon
Broadway debut
Amir
Gretchen MolEmily
Josh RadnorIsaac
Danny Ashok
Broadway debut
Abe
Karen PittmanJory

Standby: Katya Campbell (Emily), Francesca Choy-Kee (Jory), Benim Foster (Isaac) and Piter Marek (Abe, Amir)

Awards and Nominations

Tony Award®

 2015 Best Play [nominee] 

Written by Ayad Akhtar; Produced by The Araca Group, Lincoln Center Theater (André Bishop: Producing Artistic Director; Adam Siegel: Managing Director; Hattie K. Jutagir, Executive Director of Development and Planning), Jenifer Evans, Amanda Watkins, Richard Winkler, Rodger Hess, Stephanie P. McClelland, Tulchin Bartner Productions, Jessica Genick, Jonathan Reinis, Carl Levin/Ashley De Simone/TNTDynaMite Productions, Alden & Bergson/Rachel Weinstein, Greenleaf Productions, Darren DeVerna/Jere Harris, The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President) and David Merrick Arts Foundation

Theatre World

winner 2015 Award [recipient] 

Karen Pittman

Reviews


AP: "Broadway's 'Disgraced' Is Raw, Blistering"

What does Miss Manners say about how to ensure dinner conversations remain polite? Never bring up politics or religion. Thankfully, playwright Ayad Akhtar minds her no heed.

Akhtar's blistering "Disgraced" opened Thursday on Broadway at the Lyceum Theatre with a punch and power that won it a Pulitzer Prize. Few playwrights are examining what Akhtar does, certainly not with his insightfulness, and his play is breathtaking — and not a little uncomfortable — to watch. In the best of ways.

An excellent five-person cast led by Hari Dhillon — and beautifully directed by Kimberly Senior — starts the play with swagger and confidence, building to horrific exchanges in which they are at each other's throats, and then ushering a fall, much like a Manhattan "God of Carnage."

The play by the author of "American Dervish" is similarly exploring the papered-over fault lines raging beneath even the pampered and polished. In this case, he's looking at Islam, race, cultural appropriation, entitlement and determinism. The playwright sets things up with a few scenes and then lets everything explode at a dinner party in a swanky Upper East Side apartment. Things get heated. There is violence. No wonder the pork tenderloin is uneaten.

Dhillon, reprising the role he played in London, plays Amir, a South Asian self-made lawyer at a prestigious firm who is estranged from Islam. Gretchen Mol ("Boardwalk Empire") plays his wife, a white artist drawn to Islamic art. They live a privileged life, he in $600 shirts, she sipping port before dinner.

A dinner with another couple — a Jewish museum curator played by Josh Radnor and Amir's African-American co-worker, played by Karen Pittman — should be a cause for celebration for several of the group, but some spiky exchanges — oiled by plenty of booze — send it out of control.

Of the Quran, one participant declares: "It's like one very long hate mail letter to humanity." Someone else is accused of sounding like Michelle Bachmann. One admits that 9/11 filled him with "pride." Infidelity is exposed. The N-word is used.

What's fascinating is that while Akhtar is exploring race, religion and culture, he's taken class out of the equation. All four at dinner this night are clearly 1 percenters: They all work out at Equinox and shop at Magnolia Bakery.

Dhillon nails the master-of-the-universe strut and moves across the stage almost like a boxer when his anger is fueled, making his fall all the more painful, while Mol skillfully lets a silent gulf slowly emerge between her and her husband.

But perhaps the best performances are turned in by Radnor (TV's "How I Met Your Mother") and Pittman (Broadway's "Good People"), two natural stage actors who get to be funny, outraged, needy, broken and feisty — and manage to do it all in the 90-minute work.

John Lee Beatty's sophisticated set design screams understated elegance — watch for the way a wall changes artwork during scene changes. Jennifer Von Mayrhauser's costumes are spot-on for this group of wealthy folk. And Senior, marking another fruitful collaboration with Akhtar, lets the tension build naturally, the dialogue slows when it needs to and the violence shocks and repulses.

Miss Manners clearly wouldn't approve of what happens onstage. You, on the other hand, will cheer a tight and insightful production, but you may never look at dinner with friends the same way.


AP
10/23/2014

New York Daily News: "Disgraced"

“Disgraced” debuts on Broadway aglow with a Pulitzer Prize and awash in the same pros and cons of its 2012 Off-Broadway run.

On the plus side, the play is lean and timely. Ayad Akhtar, a Pakistani-American writer, delivers a claustrophobic drama by mixing the urgency and unease of post-9/11 life with universal marital anxiety. Every spouse wonders, Who is this person I married?

On the downside, conveniences stack up. And Akhtar relies on the hoariest devices around. They include an unlocked door (in an apartment where $600 shirts hang in the closet, no less) and plying lips with liquor to loosen the truth.

Even with flaws, “Disgraced” is observant and smart. Kimberly Senior, who directed the world premiere at Lincoln Center, guides a good-looking and handsomely acted production.

In 2011, cool, confident and dashing Amir Kapoor (Hari Dhillon) is a Muslim-American who’s rejected his Islamic past. He’s a star at his largely Jewish law firm and the master of an artfully constructed universe. His Upper East Side home is a looker. His blond wife, Emily (Gretchen Mol), an artist, is too. Life and work are easy, breezy.

Then there’s a change in the air. Emily, turned on by Islamic art, and Amir’s nephew Abe (Danny Ashok) persuade Amir to help an imam with possible terrorist ties. Altruism backfires. Amir is shaken as truths about his personal history emerge.

That’s the show’s first hour. In the last 25 minutes, the pulse quickens at a dinner party at Amir and Em’s. Their guests are Isaac (Josh Radnor), a Jewish curator who’s given Em a show, and his African-American wife, Jory (Karen Pittman), who works with Amir.

The party begins with tasty fennel salad and smart, chatty conversation and ends with a racist crumble. Booze flows. Then talk turns to don’t-go-there topics: religion, politics, sex. The evening becomes a bitter showdown of rage, hatred and violence.

Like sports cars, the actors hugs their characters’ curves. Dhillon, who played his role in London, nails Amir’s glossy arrogance and sense of loss. Emily is sympathetic, as played by a low-key and quiet Mol, while Radnor is convincing and natural. Pittman, an Off-Broadway holdover, again delivers a precise turn as pointed as Jory’s sexy stilettos.

Blunted by contrivances, the impact of “Disgraced” isn’t as sharp — or as potentially dangerous — as it could be.


New York Daily News
10/23/2014

Replacement/Transfer Info


The following people are credited as replacements or additions if they were not credited on opening night.


Lyceum Theatre

(10/23/2014 - 3/1/2015)
Company Manager: Eduardo Castro(Jan 20, 2015 - Mar 1, 2015).


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