Longacre Theatre, (9/28/2014 - 2/22/2015)

First Preview: Aug 26, 2014
Opening Date: Sep 28, 2014
Closing Date: Feb 22, 2015
Total Previews: 39
Total Performances: 169

Category: Play, Comedy, Farce, Revival, Broadway
Setting: June 1936. The home of Martin Vanderhof, New York.

Opening Night Production Staff

Theatre Owned / Operated by The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President)

Produced by Jeffrey Richards, Jerry Frankel, Jam Theatricals, Dominion Pictures, Gutterman & Winkler, Daryl Roth, Terry Schnuck, Jane Bergère, Caiola Productions, Rebecca Gold, LaRuffa & Hinderliter, Larry Magid, Gabrielle Palitz, Spisto & Kierstead, SunnySpot Productions, VenuWorks Theatricals, Jessica Genick and Will Trice; By special arrangement with Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes: Artistic Director; Harold Wolpert: Managing Director; Julia C. Levy: Executive Director; Sydney Beers, General Manager); Associate Producer: Michael Crea and Steven Strauss

Written by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman; Original music by Jason Robert Brown

Directed by Scott Ellis; Associate Director: Lee Kasper

Scenic Design by David Rockwell; Costume Design by Jane Greenwood; Lighting Design by Donald Holder; Sound Design by Jon Weston; Hair and Wig Design by Tom Watson; Associate Scenic Design: Richard Jaris; Associate Costume Design: Daniel Urlie; Associate Lighting Design: Carolyn Wong; Associate Sound Design: Jason Strangfeld

General Manager: Richards / Climan, Inc.; Company Manager: Bruce Klinger; Assistant Co. Mgr: Katie Titley

Technical Supervisor: Hudson Theatrical Associates; Production Stage Manager: Jennifer Rae Moore; Stage Manager: Martha Donaldson

Effects Designer: Jeremy Chernick

Fight direction by Thomas Schall; Dialect Coach: Kate Wilson; Casting: Jim Carnahan, C.S.A.; Press Representative: Irene Gandy and Alana Karpoff; Press Associate: Christopher Pineda; Advertising: Serino Coyne; Digital & Interactive: Serino Coyne, Jim Glaub, Erin Daigle, Kevin Keating, Patrick Mediate and Ryun Hobbs; Interactive Marketing: Broadway's Best Shows; Marketing and Promotions: Jeffrey Richards Associates; Animal Trainer: Lydia DesRoche; Photographer: Joan Marcus

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Opening Night Cast

Elizabeth AshleyOlga
Rose Byrne
Broadway debut
Alice
(Aug 26, 2014 - Jan 04, 2015)
James Earl JonesMartin Vanderhof
Grandpa
Annaleigh AshfordEssie
Johanna DayMrs. Kirby
Julie HalstonGay Wellington
Byron JenningsMr. Kirby
Patrick KerrMr. DePinna
Fran KranzTony Kirby
Mark Linn-BakerPaul Sycamore
(Aug 26, 2014 - Jan 04, 2015)
Kristine NielsenPenelope Sycamore
Reg RogersBoris Kolenkhov
Will BrillEd
Nick CorleyG-Man
Crystal DickinsonRheba
Austin DurantG-Man
Marc Damon JohnsonDonald
Karl KenzlerHenderson
Joe TapperG-Man

Understudies: Nick Corley (Mr. DePinna, Paul Sycamore), Barrett Doss (Alice, Essie, Rheba), Austin Durant (Boris Kolenkhov, Donald), Ned Noyes (G-Man, Henderson), Pippa Pearthree (Gay Wellington, Mrs. Kirby, Olga, Penelope Sycamore, Rheba), Joe Tapper (Ed, Tony Kirby) and Charles Turner (Martin Vanderhof, Mr. Kirby)

Awards and Nominations

Tony Award®

 2015 Best Revival of a Play [nominee] 

Produced by Jeffrey Richards, Jerry Frankel, Jam Theatricals, Dominion Pictures, Gutterman & Winkler, Daryl Roth, Terry Schnuck, Jane Bergère, Caiola Productions, Rebecca Gold, LaRuffa & Hinderliter, Larry Magid, Gabrielle Palitz, Spisto & Kierstead, SunnySpot Productions, VenuWorks Theatricals, Jessica Genick and Will Trice; Produced by arrangement with Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes: Artistic Director; Harold Wolpert: Managing Director; Julia C. Levy: Executive Director; Sydney Beers, General Manager)

winner 2015 Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play [winner] 

Annaleigh Ashford

 2015 Best Direction of a Play [nominee] 

Scott Ellis

 2015 Best Scenic Design of a Play [nominee] 

David Rockwell

 2015 Best Costume Design of a Play [nominee] 

Jane Greenwood

Drama Desk Award

winner 2015 Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play [winner] 

Annaleigh Ashford

 2015 Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play [nominee] 

Julie Halston

Reviews


AP: "'You Can't Take It With You' Crazy, Uneven"

You know the play you're watching might be a little long in the tooth when there are jokes about Eleanor Roosevelt, the Works Project Administration and Calvin Coolidge, and it makes reference to the nation's 48 states. As in not 50 yet.

The Great Depression was still palpable when Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman wrote their Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy "You Can't Take It With You" in 1936, some 23 years before Alaska and Hawaii joined the Union. A sweet revival opened Sunday at the Longacre Theatre with a perfectly picked cast but offering little reason why this old chestnut needs to be seen again.

It stars a remarkable ensemble that includes such stage luminaries as James Earl Jones, Elizabeth Ashley and Byron Jennings, the British actress Rose Byrne, seasoned veterans Kristine Nielsen and Reg Rogers, rising star Annaleigh Ashford and TV favorite Mark Linn-Baker.

The play is about the eccentric Sycamore family, which includes Ashford as an overly eager ballet dancer, Baker as a father who makes fireworks in the basement, Nielsen as a daffy playwright of a mother and Jones as a snake-raising loaf. This band of nutcases is joined by Rogers as a Russian dance teacher and Ashley as a czarist noblewoman now waitressing in exile.

Somehow, the Sycamores have managed to raise a normal child — Byrne, making her Broadway debut. She's fallen in love with the scion of a Wall Street banker, played by Fran Kranz. But when a night at the Sycamore home means explosions, a guy playing the xylophone, a woman dancing in a tutu and a man in a toga, it's no wonder she wants to keep her beau far away.

"Everybody's got a family," he reasons to her. She responds: "Not like mine."

But fate has other plans and the Sycamores end up hosting an impromptu party with the rigid, humorless parents of their daughter's betrothed, played by Jennings and Johanna Day. Cue the madness.

Though the cast is peerless, they attack it unevenly. Scott Ellis, who did brilliantly with the revival romp of the big-cast "The Mystery of Edwin Drood," has Jones at the center, understated and stately, with Rogers, Ashford and Ashley playing it so over the top it's like they're in a vaudeville act. Even so, they're almost demure compared to Julie Halston, who plays a soused actress and deserves a special Tony Award for Going Up a Flight of Stairs.

And while Byrne is supposed to be the straight one, she's taken it too far and resembles a doomed heroine from a Henry James play. She's luminous, sure, but far too serious, and Linn-Baker has decided to attack his role as if he were in a documentary. Nielsen is superb as a perpetually befuddled dreamer, while Jennings and Day are fabulous as controlled, uptight fussypants. It would be nice if they were all rowing in the same direction.

David Rockwell's overstuffed set is a wonder, beautifully capturing the Sycamores' eccentricity and love of life by putting art and bric-a-brac in every conceivable space. Jason Robert Brown, one of theater's great composers, supplied incidental music, which is like asking Bruce Springsteen to play a bat mitzvah.

But no one is credited with creating the actual fireworks that sizzle onstage, which, despite all the respected actors shooting off in different directions like errant Roman candles, are the real pretty part of this production.


AP
09/28/2014

New York Daily News: "You Can't Take It With You"

Broadway’s new production of “You Can’t Take It With You” is a time-released happy pill.

Welcome side effects include laughing yourself silly during the play. Those giggles recur days later when you recall the antics of the Sycamores, at the heart of the story.

They’re a peculiar family whose passions include pyrotechnics, snakes and dodging authority. What’s not to love — except the snakes.

Credit George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart’s enduring, endearing and endlessly witty comedy about the joys of love, family and bucking the trend. The show won a Pulitzer Prize in 1937.

Director Scott Ellis deserves kudos too for his sterling staging — from design to incidental music — and cast.

The venerable James Earl Jones anchors the ensemble, bringing heaps of goodwill and humanity as the wise, convention-weary Grandpa.

Rose Byrne (“Damages,” “Bridesmaids”) is smashing in her Broadway debut. She’s as sympathetic as she is amusing as Alice, the relatively “normal” Sycamore.

The plot is driven by her love affair with Tony Kirby (Fran Kranz, who’s excellent in the show), handsome, rich and the boss’ son.

“Just like in the movies,” Alice squeals.

Too bad Tony’s dad (Byron Jennings) is a buttoned-up Wall Streeter. His mom (Johanna Day) is all gloves-and-pearls and disapproval. But Kaufman and Hart, dreamers and realists, knew that opposites attract and that money isn’t everything.

Picking a favorite in this cast is like trying to hit a moving target. Everyone delivers. But three comic clowns are especially good.

Kristine Nielsen brings sparkly mischief and off-kilter charm as Alice’s mother. Julie Halston earns huge laughs in a small role as a family acquaintance. And the adorable and hilarious Annaleigh Ashford all but dances away with the show as Alice’s ballet-mad sister.

Like many great comedies, this play tickles the funny bone and touches the heart. One very sweet scene is a hug between Alice and her dad (Mark Linn-Baker). He dabbles in fireworks and lights a bright red sparkler that mirrors her head-over-heels feelings for Tony.

It’s a beautiful moment. When it comes to the memory of it, you can take it with you.


New York Daily News
09/28/2014

Replacement/Transfer Info


The following people are credited as replacements or additions if they were not credited on opening night.


Longacre Theatre

(9/28/2014 - 2/22/2015)

Cast

Anna Chlumsky
Broadway debut
Alice (Jan 6, 2015 - ?)
Richard Thomas
Paul Sycamore (Jan 6, 2015 - ?)


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