Cort Theatre, (4/20/2014 - 7/20/2014)

First Preview: Apr 12, 2014
Opening Date: Apr 20, 2014
Closing Date: Jul 20, 2014
Total Previews: 9
Total Performances: 105

Category: Play, Original, Broadway
Comments: Premiered in New York at the Joseph Papp Public Theater in 1998. Was considered a "Revival" for the purposes of the Tony nominations in 2014.

Opening Night Production Staff

Theatre Owned / Operated by The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President)

Produced by Michael Grandage Company, Arielle Tepper Madover, L.T.D. Productions Inc., Stacey Mindich, Starry Night Entertainment, Scott M. Delman, Martin McCallum, Stephanie P. McClelland, Zeilinger Productions and The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President); Associate Producer: Just For Laughs

Written by Martin McDonagh; Composer: Alex Baranowski

Directed by Michael Grandage; Associate Director: Timothy Koch

Scenic Design by Christopher Oram; Costume Design by Christopher Oram; Lighting Design by Paule Constable; Sound Design by Alex Baranowski; Hair Design by Campbell Young; Associate Scenic Design: Tim Mackabee; Associate Costume Design: Amanda Seymour; Associate Lighting Design: Gina Scherr; Associate Sound Design: Chris Cronin; Lighting Programmer: Michael Hill

General Manager: 101 Productions, Ltd.; Company Manager: Thom Clay

Production Manager: Aurora Productions; Production Stage Manager: Peter Wolf; Stage Manager: Lisa Buxbaum

U.K. Casting: Anne McNulty, CDG; U.S. Casting Consultant: Telsey + Company; Dialect Coach: Penny Dyer; Vocal Coach: Penny Dyer; Press Representative: Boneau / Bryan-Brown; Press Associate: Jim Byk and Christine Olver; Advertising: Serino Coyne; Marketing: Serino Coyne; Interactive Marketing: Serino Coyne; Photographer: Hugo Glendinning and Johan Perrson; Marketing and Interactive Associate: Mark Seeley and Brian DeVito

Opening Night Cast

Daniel RadcliffeBilly
Ingrid CraigieKate Osbourne
Pádraic DelaneyBabbybobby
Sarah GreeneHelen McCormick
Gillian HannaEileen Osbourne
Gary LilburnDoctor
Conor MacNeillBartley McCormick
Pat ShorttJohnnypateenmike
June WatsonMammy

Understudies: Helen Cespedes (Helen McCormick), Leslie Lyles (Eileen Osbourne, Kate Osbourne, Mammy), Aidan Redmond (Babbybobby, Doctor, Johnnypateenmike) and Josh Salt (Bartley McCormick, Billy)

Awards and Nominations

Tony Award®

 2014 Best Revival of a Play [nominee] 

Produced by Michael Grandage Company, Arielle Tepper Madover, L.T.D. Productions Inc., Stacey Mindich, Starry Night Entertainment, Scott M. Delman, Martin McCallum, Stephanie P. McClelland, Zeilinger Productions and The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President)

 2014 Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play [nominee] 

Sarah Greene

 2014 Best Direction of a Play [nominee] 

Michael Grandage

 2014 Best Scenic Design of a Play [nominee] 

Christopher Oram

 2014 Best Lighting Design of a Play [nominee] 

Paule Constable

 2014 Best Sound Design of a Play [nominee] 

Sound Design by Alex Baranowski

Drama Desk Award

 2014 Outstanding Revival of a Play [nominee] 

Produced by Michael Grandage Company, Arielle Tepper Madover, L.T.D. Productions Inc., Stacey Mindich, Starry Night Entertainment, Scott M. Delman, Martin McCallum, Stephanie P. McClelland, Zeilinger Productions and The Shubert Organization (Philip J. Smith: Chairman; Robert E. Wankel: President)

 2014 Outstanding Actor in a Play [nominee] 

Daniel Radcliffe

Theatre World

winner 2014 Award [recipient] 

Sarah Greene

Reviews


AP: "Dark Humor Wins in 'Cripple of Inishmaan'"

Contradictions of human nature are the fodder that playwright Martin McDonagh often mines in his masterfully satirical dark comedies about quirky rural Irish characters.

Now director Michael Grandage has brought the original, mostly Irish cast of his recent sold-out London production of McDonagh's "The Cripple of Inishmaan" to Broadway, with a very talented ensemble featuring Daniel Radcliffe as Billy.

Grandage's lively production, both raucous and tender, opened Sunday night at the Cort Theatre. It's the first Broadway appearance of McDonagh's 1996 tale about the insular denizens of a remote Irish island in the 1930s. Previous New York productions were off-Broadway, in 2008 at the Atlantic Theater and in 1998 at the Public Theater.

So boring is life for the residents of this small seaside village that a new feud between once-good friends is huge news, and they while away the time playing minor unkind tricks upon one another. A Hollywood movie being scouted on a nearby island soon sends them dreaming.

Radcliffe, who made his Broadway debut in a 2008 production of "Equus" and returned in 2011 to star in the Frank Loesser musical "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying," works as an integral part of the cast.

To his generally callous neighbors, teenage Billy is just a target of ridicule, and how he became handicapped is one of the secrets that twist and turn throughout the play. Without showboating his twisted arm and leg, Radcliffe gives Billy a physical frailty and inner toughness combined with yearning that makes him a very sympathetic figure. Billy's desire to escape from the stifling loneliness and tedium of his narrow-minded country village is at the core of the story.

McDonagh ricochets between crass humor, careless cruelty and tender sorrow, all the while poking fun at Irish folklore, toying with stereotypes, and setting his characters up to have their dreams crushed. He suddenly reverses their backstories or presents unseen sides to their personalities that upend what the audience thinks it knows.

Pat Shortt is blustery fun as the town's gossip-monger, who fancies himself the town crier while bartering his news tidbits for food. Far from being the loving son who lives at home with his sainted mother, he's been plying his foul-mouthed, ancient Mammy (a marvelously dour, rubbery-faced June Watson) with liquor for years, in hopes of killing her.

Billy's secret crush is Helen (played with gleeful meanness and a perfect touch of insecurity by Sarah Greene). She's a beautiful young redhead who seems unnecessarily cruel. Her sharp-tongued, egg-tossing ways too easily escalate to possible animal brutality. She also provides brittle, anti-Catholic comedy with her casual references to the clergy whose groping she's violently fending off since childhood, at one point boasting, "I ruptured a curate at age 6."

Padraic Delaney seems genuinely kindhearted as a boat owner who helps Billy. Conor MacNeill is quite funny as Helen's tormented, candy-obsessed younger brother Bartley, while Gary Lilburn provides a grounding presence as the town doctor.

Two of the most wonderfully wrought characters are Billy's comical yet brooding aunts who have raised him. Their repetitious, chorus-like banter is given delightful nuance by Gillian Hanna and Ingrid Craigie. Christiopher Oram's rustic, slightly decaying, stone-laden set and simple, drab costumes add to the downtrodden atmosphere.

While Billy's coming of age is tinged with melodrama by McDonagh's fervid plotting, he and his fellow Inishmaan residents remain memorable and richly drawn, providing an evening of boisterous theatricality that overlays buried empathy for our shared human frailties.


AP
04/21/2014

New York Daily News: "The Cripple of Inishmaan"

Daniel Radcliffe has appeared naked on stage, but he’s never been as emotionally raw or as steady on his feet as he is now portraying Billy, a palsied Irish bloke who can barely walk in “The Cripple of Inishmaan.”

The former Harry Potter plays the title role in Martin McDonagh’s hilarious and haunting comedy — and casts a spell with humor, smarts and contagious compassion. This is the 24-year-old actor’s best performance on Broadway, where he’s previously headlined the drama “Equus” and the musical “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.”

Radcliffe’s impressive work here is matched by his fellow actors, the direction and design of this show from London marking the 1996 play’s debut on Broadway. It’s been seen downtown in 1998 and 2008. One quibble with Michael Grandage’s very fine staging is that a vague final moment blunts the impact of the funny-sad tale a wee bit.

Set on a rugged island off the western coast of Ireland, the play considers life’s realities and dualities. The plot slyly capitalizes on an actual 1934 event — American documentary maker Robert Flaherty is in the area shooting “Man of Aran.”

Sickly but whip-smart, Billy seeks to parlay a visit to the nearby film set into a life far away from his devoted but daft aunties Eileen (Gillian Hanna), who’s got dagger eyes and a never-sated sweet tooth, and Kate (Ingrid Craigie), who talks to stones. And they’re not the only eccentrics he’d leave in his wake.

There’s the local blabbermouth Johnnypateenmike (Pat Shortt), his ancient alcoholic mammy (June Watson), volatile widow Babbybobby (Padraic Delaney), teen temptress Helen (Sarah Greene, walking dynamite) and her obsessive kid brother Bartley (a delightful Conor MacNeill).

Ace storyteller McDonagh (“The Pillowman,” “The Lieutenant of Inishmore”) makes these folksy characters’ behavior and conversations churn with wicked laughter and wise insights. Like most fables, things darken as truths and lessons emerge — like the one about how people who love and help us also hurt us.

Better yet, there’s the one about how a journey to a far-away place leaves you flat and a kiss from a local girl gives you a reason for living. Now if only fate would cooperate.

Through it all Radcliffe tightly hugs the curves of the spirited Billy’s journey. He vividly captures the melancholy, determination and, all too fleetingly, his joy.


New York Daily News
04/20/2014

Replacement/Transfer Info


The following people are credited as replacements or additions if they were not credited on opening night.


Cort Theatre

(4/20/2014 - 7/20/2014)

Cast

Aidan Redmond
Doctor

Understudies: Stephen Rowe (Doctor).


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