Plymouth Theatre, (4/28/1997 - 1/07/2001)

First Preview: Mar 21, 1997
Opening Date: Apr 28, 1997
Closing Date: Jan 07, 2001
Total Previews: 45
Total Performances: 1543

Category: Musical, Drama, Original, Broadway
Setting: In and around London.

Opening Night Production Staff

Theatre Owned / Operated by The Shubert Organization (Gerald Schoenfeld: Chairman; Philip J. Smith: President; Robert E. Wankel: Executive Vice President)

Produced by PACE Theatrical Group, Inc. and Fox Theatricals; Produced in association with Jerry Frankel, Magicworks Entertainment and The Landmark Entertainment Group (Tony Christopher, Founder; Gary Goddard, Founder); Associate Producer: Bill Young

Previous developmental production directed by Gregory Boyd at The Alley Theatre (Gregory Boyd, Artistic Director; Paul Tetreault, Managing Director); Previous developmental production by: The 5th Avenue Musical Theatre Company (Frank M. Young, Executive Director; Marilynn Sheldon, Managing Director) and Theatre Under the Stars (Frank M. Young, Founder and Artistic Director)

Conceived for the stage by Frank Wildhorn and Steve Cuden; Book by Leslie Bricusse; Lyrics by Leslie Bricusse; Music by Frank Wildhorn; From the novella "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" by Robert Louis Stevenson; Music orchestrated by Kim Scharnberg; Musical Director: Jason Howland; Vocal arrangements by Jason Howland and Ron Melrose; Additional lyrics by Steve Cuden and Frank Wildhorn; Associate Musical Dir.: Ron Melrose

Directed by Robin Phillips; Choreographed by Joey Pizzi

Scenic Design by Robin Phillips; Costume Design by Ann Curtis; Lighting Design by Beverly Emmons; Sound Design by Karl Richardson and Scott Stauffer; Wig Design by Paul Huntley; Co - Scenic Design: James Noone

General Manager: Niko Associates, Inc. (Manny Kladitis, Founder and President); Executive Producer: Gary Gunas; Company Manager: Bruce Klinger

Production Stage Manager: Maureen F. Gibson; Stage Manager: David Hyslop

Musical Supervisor: Jeremy Roberts; Musical Coordinator: John Miller; Conducted by Jason Howland; Associate Conductor: Ron Melrose; Concert Master: Dale Stuckenbruck; Violin: Nam Sook Lee; Viola: Debra Shufelt; Cello: Ted Mook; Bass: David Finck; Woodwinds: Robert Bush, Matt Dine and Paul Garment; Horn: R.J. Kelley; Trombone: Herb Besson; Percussion: James Saporito and Randall Hicks; Keyboards: Mick Rossi, Jan Rosenberg and William Stein

Special Effects by Gregory Meeh

Casting: Hughes / Moss Casting; Public Relations: Richard Kornberg & Associates; Fight Coordinator: J. Allen Suddeth; Marketing: Nancy Richards; Advertising: Serino Coyne, Inc.; Dance Captain: David Koch; Fight Captain: David Koch

[See More]

Opening Night Cast

Robert CuccioliDr. Henry Jekyll
(Mar 21, 1997 - Jan 03, 1999)
Edward Hyde
Jekyll's "other half"
(Mar 21, 1997 - Jan 03, 1999)
Linda Eder
Broadway debut
Lucy
(Mar 21, 1997 - Aug 30, 1998)
Boy Soprano
at the wedding
(Mar 21, 1997 - Aug 30, 1998)
Robert Evan
Wednesday and Saturday matinees
Dr. Henry Jekyll
(Mar 21, 1997 - Jan 03, 1999)
Edward Hyde
Jekyll's "other half"
(Mar 21, 1997 - Jan 03, 1999)
Barrie InghamSir Danvers Carew
George MerrittJohn Utterson
Christiane Noll
Broadway debut
Emma Carew
Jekyll's fiance
(Mar 21, 1997 - Jan 03, 1999)
Geoffrey BlaisdellGeneral Lord Glossop
Siegfried
the Pianist at "The Red Hat"
Policeman
Barrow Boy
David ChaneyAn Old Man
in the mental hospital
Davie
a barrow boy
Manservant at Sir Danvers'
Mr. Bissett
an apothecary
A Maitre d'Hotel
at a social club
Priest at wedding
Bill E. Dietrich
Broadway debut
Mental Patient
Bill
a docker
Groom
A Tough
at "The Red Hat"
A Newsboy
Choir Boy
John Treacy Egan
Broadway debut
Mike
a clerk
Groom
Donald GrodyDoctor
Lord G
Poole
Jekyll's manservant
Leah HockingKate
a cockle seller
Michael IngramRupert
Bishop of Basingstoke
Sir Douglas
Policeman
Barrow Boy
Bishop of Bathingstoke
David KochMental Patient
Ned
a sailor
A Tough
at "The Red Hat"
Frank MastroneAttendant
Albert
a barman
First Gentleman
A Priest
at the Bishop's funeral
Raymond Jaramillo McLeodMr. Simon Stride
Corinne MelançonBridesmaid
Brad Oscar
Broadway debut
Right Honourable Archibald Proops
Second Gentleman
Sir Peter
Barrow Boy
Molly Scott PesceMolly
a fish gutter
Bonnie SchonPolly
a scrubber woman
Whore
Emily Scott Skinner
Broadway debut
Nurse
Alice
a scullery maid
Housemaid
Whore
Bridesmaid
Jodi StevensNurse
Bet
a scullery maid
Housemaid
A Young Girl
managed by Gwinny
Bridesmaid
Martin Van TreurenLord Savage
The Spider
proprietor of "The Red Hat"
Charles E. Wallace
Broadway debut
Attendant
Jack
a beggar
Under Footman
A Tough
at "The Red Hat"
A Doorman
at a social club
Curate
Emily ZachariasLady Beaconsfield
Guinevere
manageress of "The Red Hat"

Swings: Paul Hadobas and Rebecca Spencer

Understudies: Geoffrey Blaisdell (John Utterson, Poole), Bill E. Dietrich (Dr. Henry Jekyll, Edward Hyde, Right Honourable Archibald Proops), John Treacy Egan (General Lord Glossop, Rupert), Donald Grody (Sir Danvers Carew), Leah Hocking (Emma Carew, Lucy), David Koch (Mr. Simon Stride), Frank Mastrone (Dr. Henry Jekyll, Edward Hyde, Lord Savage, The Spider), Brad Oscar (Poole), Bonnie Schon (Guinevere, Lady Beaconsfield), Emily Scott Skinner (Emma Carew, Lucy), Jodi Stevens (Emma Carew, Lucy) and Martin Van Treuren (Sir Danvers Carew)

Awards and Nominations

Tony Award®

 1997 Best Book of a Musical [nominee] 

Book by Leslie Bricusse

 1997 Best Actor in a Musical [nominee] 

Robert Cuccioli

 1997 Best Costume Design [nominee] 

Ann Curtis

 1997 Best Lighting Design [nominee] 

Beverly Emmons

Drama Desk Award

winner 1997 Outstanding Actor in a Musical [winner] 

Robert Cuccioli

 1997 Outstanding Actress in a Musical [nominee] 

Linda Eder

winner 1997 Outstanding Set Design of a Musical [winner] 

Robin Phillips and James Noone; Set Decoration by Christina Poddubiuk

Theatre World

winner 1997 Award [recipient] 

Linda Eder

Songs

music by Frank Wildhorn; lyrics by Leslie Bricusse
(Unless otherwise noted)


ACT 1 Sung By
Lost In The DarknessDr. Henry Jekyll
FaçadeEnsemble
Jekyll's PleaDr. Henry Jekyll and The Board of Governors
Façade (Reprise) Ensemble
Emma's ReasonsMr. Simon Stride and Emma Carew (Jekyll's fiance)
Take Me As I AmDr. Henry Jekyll and Emma Carew (Jekyll's fiance)
Letting GoSir Danvers Carew and Emma Carew (Jekyll's fiance)
Façade (Reprise) Ensemble
No One Knows Who I AmLucy
Good 'N' EvilLucy
This Is The MomentDr. Henry Jekyll
Alive
(lyrics by Leslie Bricusse, Steve Cuden and Frank Wildhorn)
Edward Hyde (Jekyll's "other half")
His Work, And Nothing More
(lyrics by Leslie Bricusse, Steve Cuden and Frank Wildhorn)
Dr. Henry Jekyll, John Utterson, Sir Danvers Carew and Emma Carew (Jekyll's fiance)
Someone Like YouLucy
Alive (Reprise)
(lyrics by Leslie Bricusse, Steve Cuden and Frank Wildhorn)
Edward Hyde (Jekyll's "other half") and Ensemble
ACT 2 Sung By
Murder, Murder
(lyrics by Leslie Bricusse, Steve Cuden and Frank Wildhorn)
A Newsboy and Ensemble
Once Upon A Dream
(lyrics by Steve Cuden, Leslie Bricusse and Frank Wildhorn)
Emma Carew (Jekyll's fiance)
ObsessionDr. Henry Jekyll
In His EyesLucy and Emma Carew (Jekyll's fiance)
Dangerous GameEdward Hyde (Jekyll's "other half") and Lucy
The Way BackDr. Henry Jekyll
A New LifeLucy
Sympathy, TendernessEdward Hyde (Jekyll's "other half")
Lost In The Darkness (Reprise) Dr. Henry Jekyll
ConfrontationDr. Henry Jekyll and Edward Hyde (Jekyll's "other half")
Façade (Reprise) Ensemble
Dear Lord And Father of MankindBoy Soprano (at the wedding)

Reviews


New York Daily News: "No Reason to 'Hyde'"

After the rigors of "Titanic," "Steel Pier" and "The Life," "Jekyll & Hyde" Leslie Bricusse and Frank Wildhorn's musical adaptation of the Robert Louis Stevenson story of a man exploring his animal nature looked good.

Unlike the other musicals, which adhered, however weakly, to the traditions developed in the American theater over many decades, "Jekyll & Hyde" is very much in the British mold.

Britstyle means that the story comes with Classics Illustrated foreshortening. Character and plot are rudimentary. The music is lush and appealing, and the lyrics are more than a little silly. (Bricusse rhymes "demon" with "Dream on" and has Jekyll sing: "What is this thing inside of me?/What evil force makes Edward Hyde of me?")

What such successful British musicals as "Phantom" and "Les Miz" have done is to restore 19th-century melodrama to a theater that imagined it had outgrown such things.

The audience, though, never outgrew them. It never cottoned to the cerebralization of the American musical that occurred before the British onslaught. There are, in fact, fascinating undercurrents to a story that examines Victorian sexual repression, that pre-figures Freud's idea of the id, but Britstyle precludes too much meaning.

"Jekyll" is, of course, pure melodrama. Dr. Jekyll, an upper-class physician in Victorian London, thwarted in his attempts to use terminal patients to study the bestial underbelly of human nature, experiments on himself, becoming Mr. Hyde, who hurts and even kills without guilt.

On a foray through the underworld, the upstanding Jekyll meets and falls in love with a prostitute, Lucy. It is Hyde, however, who has a liaison with her. When she asks Jekyll to treat the bruises she has suffered and tells him who inflicted them, Jekyll realizes Hyde has a life of his own. Jekyll tries to warn her of the danger she is in, but the misanthropic, misogynistic Hyde succeeds in murdering her.

As with any melodrama, in pure prose we might be appalled, but with Wildhorn's sometimes syrupy, sometimes grandiose but always melodic music, we can swallow a lot more. Several numbers notably "This Is the Moment" and "Someone Like You" are genuinely moving.

Robin Phillips has directed and designed the show in the grand manner it requires and has drawn superb performances from his cast.

Robert Cuccioli, who has the looks and talent of an old-fashioned matinee idol and whom I have admired since the revival of "The Rothschilds" in 1990, is sensational in the title roles, especially in "Confrontation," in which he alternates between his two natures smashingly.

Linda Eder sings forcefully (admittedly with echo-chamber assistance) and acts well enough as the hapless Lucy. Christiane Noll sings enchantingly as Jekyll's upper-class fiance. There is strong work by George Merritt as his close friend and Barrie Ingham as his prospective father-in-law.

Like Phillips' evocative sets, Ann Curtis' costumes capture the period beautifully. Beverly Emmons' lighting adds immensely to the drama.

"Jekyll & Hyde" may be campy. It may be derivative of all sorts of other musicals, but it has its own power.


New York Daily News
04/29/1997

New York Post: "Jekyll & Hyde: split decision"

A musical in which the hero is little better than a well-dressed Victorian werewolf? A musical finally making it to Broadway after a concept CD has been around for years in developmental limbo?

Evidently so, for last night, at the Plymouth Theater, the brave but unfortunately clunky "Jekyll & Hyde," with book and lyrics by Leslie Bricusse, music by Frank Wildhorn and a splendidly virtuosic performance by Robert Cuccioli, took its first bow. Or, in deference to its hero's dichotomous nature, perhaps we should say "its first two bows."

In 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson's novella "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" struck a chord, and it has been striking it at regular intervals, in differing tonalities, ever since.

The dual nature of man -- and Stevenson's excursion preceded the wholesale explorations of latter-day psychiatrists into that capacity for good and evil -- in one schizophrenic soul had not passed the likes of Shakespeare completely unnoticed.

But Stevenson, with his combination of puritanical Victorian Gothic horror and expansive Victorian popular science, as well as a prose style whose unvarnished elegance would have credited Defoe, gave that duality a literary life of its own that has never ceased to fascinate.

Stevenson's work was not even two years old when a man called Sullivan adapted it for the American stage, shrewdly adding a love interest and making it a staple in the repertoire of Richard Mansfield until shortly before the actor's death in 1907.

Other stage versions followed; later, there were the movies, including a silent with John Barrymore and two famous talkies, the first with Fredric March and the second, and better, with Spencer Tracy.

So the horror story just won't lie down, although this present, clumsy musical is not likely to galvanize its life. If it's perhaps impossible to make a totally dull thing out of this clinical tale, Bricusse's diffuse book and banal lyrics matched with Wildhorn's florid music come perilously close.

The book of the musical has more in common with the movie versions than the far cooler original, even though a few of Stevenson's characters, mostly differently employed, remain. Bricusse's difficulty has been in giving his narrative any smooth flow, so the story huffs and puffs along predictably but not revealingly.

Nor are his lyrics of any particular grace, while Wildhorn's music achieves what some must have thought impossible -- it seems faintly, and perhaps not sufficiently, derivative of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Claude Michel Schonberg, the latter particularly in his "Les Miserables" mode.

In fairness, Stephen Sondheim is not entirely neglected, for the ensemble number "Facade" at the musical's opening and close sounds as though it could well be a socially aware reject from "Sweeney Todd."

There is an anthem-like lyricism here -- good stuff for ice-skating and the like -- but this seems music that, while dutifully, even desperately, plucking at the heartstrings, never touches the heart.

Robin Phillips, who has not only directed the musical with adroit smoke and mirrors but, with James Noone, been responsible for the inventive and sharply stylized stage design, has also done a good job in tying together Bricusse's very scrappy book and in eliciting generally sharp performances.

The look of the show is unexpectedly tasteful. Ann Curtis' costumes reveal a period flair; Beverly Emmons' lighting proves helpfully atmospheric; and whatever Christina Poddubuik provided under the heading of "Properties and Set Dressing," she appears to have provided well.

Few of the characters are permitted to stand out from the crowd, although the ever-stalwart Barrie Ingham brings dignity to Sir Danvers Carew (Hyde's murder victim in Stevenson, here transformed into the father of Jekyll's fiancee!); and Christiane Noll and, most particularly, a spirited and sexy Linda Eder do respectively fine as -- again, unknown to Stevenson – Jekyll/Hyde's sacred and profane loves.

The truly notable performance fortunately, comes whence it must to give the show a chance: Robert Cuccioli's chillingly brilliant and schizoid Jekyll/Hyde.

As, from accounts, Mansfield did before him, Cuccioli uses no makeup or devices for his transformation from a stern, Javert-like Jekyll to a nastily slavering Hyde. His voice is strong -- he has the ice-skater hit "This is the Time" to sing, and whether it's the time, it certainly is the voice! -- and his handsome presence is sinisterly compelling.

This is not that much of a musical, but Cuccioli, Eder and Phillips do their best to make that "not that much" appear markedly more, and they deserve all the luck I sincerely wish them.

"Jekyll & Hyde" is not nearly as good as "Les Miz," but it is not so far down the same food chain that it couldn't find an audience. It will doubtless be waiting anxiously for the Tonys and tourists.


New York Post
04/29/1997

Replacement/Transfer Info


The following people are credited as replacements or additions if they were not credited on opening night.


Plymouth Theatre

(4/28/1997 - 1/7/2001)
Company Manager: Carl Pasbjerg.

Production Stage Manager: David Hyslop; Stage Manager: James Mountcastle.

Associate Conductor: Jan Rosenberg(May 1998 - ?); Percussion: Larry Lelli.

Cast

Sebastian Bach
Dr. Henry Jekyll (Jun 13, 2000 - Oct 15, 2000)
Edward Hyde
Jekyll's "other half"
(Jun 13, 2000 - Oct 15, 2000)
Anastasia Barzee
Emma Carew
Jekyll's fiance
(Jan 5, 1999 - Jan 23, 2000)
Juan Betancur
A Newsboy
Bill
a docker
Choir Boy
Groom
Mental Patient
Robert DuSold
Rupert
Bishop of Basingstoke
Robert Evan
Dr. Henry Jekyll (Jan 5, 1999 - Jan 23, 2000)
Edward Hyde
Jekyll's "other half"
(Jan 5, 1999 - Jan 23, 2000)
Merwin Foard
Mr. Simon Stride
Erika Greene
Molly
a fish gutter
David Hasselhoff
Dr. Henry Jekyll (Oct 17, 2000 - Jan 7, 2001)
Edward Hyde
Jekyll's "other half"
(Oct 17, 2000 - Jan 7, 2001)
Leah Hocking
Lucy
Peter Johl
Doctor
Lord G
Poole
Jekyll's manservant
Joseph Mahowald
Dr. Henry Jekyll
Edward Hyde
Jekyll's "other half"
Stuart Marland
Barrow Boy
General Lord Glossop
Policeman
Siegfried
the Pianist at "The Red Hat"
Luba Mason
Lucy (Sep 1, 1998 - Jan 23, 2000)
Corinne Melançon
Alice
a scullery maid
Housemaid
Nurse
Whore
Kelli O'Hara
Broadway debut
Kate
a cockle seller
(Jul 20, 2000 - Jan 7, 2001)
Max Perlman
Ensemble (May 1999 - Aug 1999)
Mike
a clerk
(May 1999 - Aug 1999)
Andrea Rivette
Emma Carew
Jekyll's fiance
(Jan 25, 2000 - Jan 7, 2001)
John Schiappa
Mental Patient
Ned
a sailor
Coleen Sexton
Lucy (Jan 25, 2000 - Jan 7, 2001)
Kate Shindle
Broadway debut
Bet
a scullery maid
A Young Girl
managed by Gwinny
Bridesmaid
Housemaid
Nurse
Jodi Stevens
Wednesday and Saturday matinees
Lucy Alternate
Kay Story
A Young Girl
managed by Gwinny
Bet
a scullery maid
Bridesmaid
Housemaid
Nurse
Christy Tarr
Kate
a cockle seller
Jack Wagner
Dr. Henry Jekyll (Jan 25, 2000 - Jun 11, 2000)
Edward Hyde
Jekyll's "other half"
(Jan 25, 2000 - Jun 11, 2000)
Russell Warfield
A Doorman
at a social club
A Tough
at "The Red Hat"
Attendant
Curate
Jack
a beggar
Under Footman
Rod Weber
Mental Patient
A Newsboy
Bill
a docker


Swings: Erika Greene (Partial Swing), Christy Tarr, Carmen Yurich.

Understudies: Juan Betancur (Dr. Henry Jekyll, Edward Hyde, Right Honourable Archibald Proops), John Treacy Egan (John Utterson), Paul Hadobas (Lord Savage, Right Honourable Archibald Proops, Rupert, The Spider), Peter Johl (Sir Danvers Carew), Stuart Marland (John Utterson), Corinne Melançon (Lucy), Kelli O'Hara (Emma Carew), John Schiappa (Lord Savage, The Spider), Kate Shindle (Lucy), Rebecca Spencer (Emma Carew, Guinevere, Lady Beaconsfield).


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