Ethel Barrymore Theatre, (11/29/2006 - 7/01/2007)

First Preview: Oct 30, 2006
Opening Date: Nov 29, 2006
Closing Date: Jul 01, 2007
Total Previews: 34
Total Performances: 246

Category: Musical, Drama, Revival, Broadway
Setting: New York City. Now.

Opening Night Production Staff

Theatre Owned / Operated by The Shubert Organization (Gerald Schoenfeld: Chairman; Philip J. Smith: President; Robert E. Wankel: Executive Vice President)

Produced by Marc Routh, Richard Frankel, Thomas Viertel, Steven Baruch, Ambassador Theatre Group, Tulchin Bartner Productions, Darren Bagert and Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park (Edward Stern, Producing Artistic Director; Buzz Ward, Executive Director)

This production of 'Company' was originally produced by Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park (Edward Stern, Producing Artistic Director; Buzz Ward, Executive Director)

Music by Stephen Sondheim; Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim; Book by George Furth; Music orchestrated by Mary-Mitchell Campbell

Directed by John Doyle; Musical Staging by John Doyle; Associate Director: Adam John Hunter

Scenic Design by David Gallo; Costume Design by Ann Hould-Ward; Lighting Design by Thomas C. Hase; Sound Design by Andrew Keister; Hair and Wig Design by David H. Lawrence; Make-Up Design by Angelina Avallone; Associate Scenic Design: Mary Hamrick; Associate Costume Design: Sidney Shannon; Associate Lighting Design: Paul Miller

General Manager: Richard Frankel Productions and Jo Porter; Company Manager: Sammy Ledbetter; Associate Co. Mgr: Jason Pelusio

Production Manager: Juniper Street Productions and Hillary Blanken; Production Stage Manager: Gary Mickelson; Stage Manager: Newton Cole

Musical Supervisor: Mary-Mitchell Campbell; Resident Music Supervisor: Lynne Shankel

Casting: Telsey + Company; Press Representative: Barlow-Hartman Public Relations; Advertising: Serino Coyne, Inc.; Production Photography: Paul Kolnik; Dance Captain: Newton Cole

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Opening Night Cast

Raúl Esparza
Percussion
Robert
Keith Buterbaugh
Trumpet, Trombone
Harry
Matt Castle
Piano/Keyboards, Double Bass
Peter
Robert Cunningham
Trumpet, Drums
Paul
Angel Desai
Keyboard, Violin, Alto Sax
Marta
Kelly Jeanne Grant
Flute, Alto Sax
Kathy
Kristin Huffman
Flute, Alto Sax, Piccolo
Sarah
Amy Justman
Piano/Keyboards, Orchestra Bells
Susan
Heather Laws
French Horn, Trumpet, Flute
Amy
Leenya Rideout
Violin, Guitar, Double Bass
Jenny
Fred Rose
Cello, Alto Sax, Tenor Sax
David
Bruce Sabath
Clarinet, Drums
Larry
Elizabeth Stanley
Oboe, Tuba, Alto Sax
April
Barbara Walsh
Orchestra Bells, Percussion
Joanne

Standby: Renée Bang Allen (Joanne, Sarah), Brandon J. Ellis (David, Paul), David Garry (Harry, Larry, Paul), Jason Ostrowski (Peter), Fred Rose (Robert), Jessica Wright (Amy, Jenny, Susan) and Katrina Yaukey (April, Kathy, Marta)

Awards and Nominations

Tony Award®

winner 2007 Best Revival of a Musical [winner] 

Produced by Marc Routh, Richard Frankel, Thomas Viertel, Steven Baruch, Ambassador Theatre Group, Tulchin Bartner Productions, Darren Bagert and Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park (Edward Stern, Producing Artistic Director; Buzz Ward, Executive Director)

 2007 Best Actor in a Musical [nominee] 

Raúl Esparza

 2007 Best Direction of a Musical [nominee] 

John Doyle

Drama Desk Award

winner 2007 Outstanding Revival of a Musical [winner] 

Produced by Marc Routh, Richard Frankel, Thomas Viertel, Steven Baruch, Ambassador Theatre Group, Tulchin Bartner Productions, Darren Bagert and Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park (Edward Stern, Producing Artistic Director; Buzz Ward, Executive Director)

winner 2007 Outstanding Actor in a Musical [winner] 

Raúl Esparza

 2007 Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical [nominee] 

Barbara Walsh

 2007 Outstanding Director of a Musical [nominee] 

John Doyle

winner 2007 Outstanding Orchestrations [winner] 

Mary-Mitchell Campbell

Songs

music by Stephen Sondheim; lyrics by Stephen Sondheim

ACT 1 Sung By
CompanyRobert and Company
The Little Things You Do TogetherJoanne and Company
Sorry - GratefulHarry, David and Larry
You Could Drive a Person CrazyApril, Kathy and Marta
Have I Got a Girl for YouLarry, Peter, Paul, David and Harry
Someone is WaitingRobert
Another Hundred PeopleMarta
Getting Married TodayAmy, Paul, Sarah and Company
Marry Me a LittleRobert
ACT 2 Sung By
Side By Side By SideRobert and Company
What Would We Do Without You?Robert and Company
Poor BabySarah, Jenny, Susan, Amy and Joanne
BarcelonaRobert and April
The Ladies Who LunchJoanne
Being AliveRobert

Reviews


AP: "Company"

Bobby baby, why can’t you play a musical instrument? Fear of commitment or just not musically talented?

That nagging question permeates much of director John Doyle’s chilly, high-concept revival of Stephen Sondheim’s “Company,” which opened Wednesday at Broadway’s Ethel Barrymore Theatre.

Doyle, you may recall, is the man who had actors doubling as musicians in last season’s critically acclaimed production of another Sondheim classic, “Sweeny Todd.” He does the same here, as we watch perpetual bachelor Bobby gaze uneasily at the relationships of several married friends as well as his own dealings with single, available women.

That theatrical multitasking worked well for the grisly tale of Todd, adding a weird dimension to the already creepy story of a murderous barber in 19th-century industrial London. With the more modern “Company,” first seen on Broadway in 1970 and revived there in 1995, double duty seems unnecessary, a bit pretentious and limiting to the musical ambitions of Sondheim’s fine score.

As a result, the episodic sketches concocted by book writer George Firth loom larger and more lethargically than in previous productions. We get variations on marital accommodations and adventures in late 20th century New York. The couple who contradict each other; the twosome who get divorced and then stay together; the pot-smoking duo; and the acerbic liquor-swilling matron and her mild devoted husband.

This version of Furth’s book is not exactly what Broadway saw more than 35 years ago. It’s a composite of previous editions, including a 1995 production that had Bobby dabbling in homosexuality.

Bobby’s indecisiveness is accentuated by Raul Esparza’s fidgety, sometimes mannered performance. This man telegraphs his emotions even if he doesn’t articulate his feelings.

At one point, Esparza poses like a modern-day martyr, standing weirdly as if he were St. Sebastian against a looming white column that divides the Barrymore stage. Unlike Sebastian, though, he isn’t pierced by arrows but by the stinging barbs of his critical friends.

Those friends are played by actors, who, like Esparza, appeared in this revival when it was done earlier in the year at Cincinnati’s Playhouse in the Park. They are a likeable group, but they rarely raise the show’s theatrical temperature.

It might be those musical instruments. Marching around the stage while carrying a French horn or a triangle would make anyone feel self-conscious. You can see these performers working their way through the roles—and carefully concentrating on playing those instruments when they should be creating characters.

Still, a few manage to make more than a passing impression. Elizabeth Stanley projects an endearing sweetness as April, the flight attendant always flying off to Barcelona. And Bruce Sabath has a warm singing voice as the put-upon husband of the tart-tongued Joanne.

Joanne—played in the original by the indomitable Elaine Stritch—is given a brittle, occasionally strident portrayal by Barbara Walsh. The actress, though, does well enough with “The Ladies Who Lunch,” which is not any easy thing to do considering the song is practically a Stritch anthem.

“Compnay” is a musical about relationships—or the lack of relationships. They may be messy and misunderstood, but they are better than the lonely alternative that is facing Bobby on his 35th birthday.

The show may not always be joyous, but it shouldn’t be funereal, which is what occasionally comes across in this production. Maybe it is the monochromatic costumes. Or the spare, almost nonexistent setting, which has the actors quietly sitting on the stage—sort of like in the cemetery scene in “Our Town”—when they aren’t performing. There’s even a vase of lilies on the baby grand.

By the time Bobby gets to his revelatory moment—“Being Alive”—and sits down at the piano, we are more than ready for his enlightenment. Esparza, who has a powerful voice, give it his all. The man finally surrenders to his feelings, and for the first time during the evening, we are touched.


AP
11/29/2006

Replacement/Transfer Info


The following people are credited as replacements or additions if they were not credited on opening night.


Ethel Barrymore Theatre

(11/29/2006 - 7/1/2007)
Company Manager: Jason Pelusio; Assistant Co. Mgr: Tanase Popa.

Press Representative: Leslie Baden.

Cast

Jane Pfitsch
French Horn, Trumpet, Flute [Played the role through Nov. 12]
Amy


Standbys: Bradley Dean (Robert), Jane Pfitsch (Amy, Jenny, Susan).


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