John Golden Theatre, (5/01/1980 - 6/14/1980)
Royale Theatre, (6/17/1980 - 9/27/1981)

First Preview: Apr 02, 1980
Opening Date: May 01, 1980
Closing Date: Sep 27, 1981
Total Previews: 9
Total Performances: 588

Category: Musical, Comedy, Revue, Original, Broadway
Setting: "A Day in Hollywood" set in the lobby of Grauman's Chinese Theater. "A Night in the Ukraine" set in the morning room of the Pavlenko residence in the Ukraine before the Revolution.

Opening Night Production Staff

Theatre Owned / Operated by The Shubert Organization (Gerald Schoenfeld: Chairman; Bernard B. Jacobs: President)

Produced by Alexander H. Cohen and Hildy Parks; Co - Producer: Roy A. Somlyo; Associate Producer: Philip M. Getter

Book by Dick Vosburgh; Music by Frank Lazarus; Lyrics by Dick Vosburgh; Musical Director: Wally Harper; Vocal arrangements by Wally Harper; Dance arrangements by Wally Harper; "A Night in the Ukraine" loosely based on "The Bear" by Anton Chekhov

Directed by Tommy Tune; Choreographed by Tommy Tune; Co - Choreographer: Thommie Walsh

Scenic Design by Tony Walton; Costume Design by Michel Stuart; Lighting Design by Beverly Emmons; Sound Design by Otts Munderloh; Hair Design by Joseph Dal Corso; Make-Up Design by Joe Cranzano

General Manager: Roy A. Somlyo; Company Manager: Charles Willard and Joel Wyman

Production Stage Manager: Thomas Kelly; Stage Manager: Christopher A. Cohen; Technical Supervisor: Joseph Monaco; Technical Coordinator: Arthur Siccardi

Conducted by Allen Cohen; Pianist: Allen Cohen and Rod Derefinko; Music Contractor: John Monaco

Production Associate: Seymour Herscher; Casting: Meg Simon and Fran Kumin; Press Representative: Alpert / LeVine; Dance Captain: Albert Stephenson; Technical Coordinator: Arthur Siccardi; Advertising: Ash / LeDonne; Photographer: Martha Swope

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Opening Night Cast

Kate Draper"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Nina
Mrs. Pavlenko's Daughter
David Garrison"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Serge B. Samovar
a Moscow Lawyer
Niki Harris"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Masha
the Maid
Peggy Hewett"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Mrs. Pavlenko
a Rich Widow
Stephen James"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Constantine
a Coachman
Frank Lazarus"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Carlo
Mrs. Pavlenko's Italian Footman
Priscilla Lopez"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Gino
Mrs. Pavlenko's Gardener
Albert Stephenson"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Sascha
a Manservant

Standby: Mitchell Greenberg ("A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble, Carlo, Serge B. Samovar)

Understudies: Karen Harvey ("A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble, Masha), Jack Magradey ("A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble, Constantine, Sascha), Tudi Roach ("A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble, Gino, Nina) and Celia Tackaberry ("A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble, Mrs. Pavlenko)

Awards and Nominations

Tony Award®

 1980 Best Musical [nominee] 

Produced by Alexander H. Cohen and Hildy Parks

 1980 Best Book of a Musical [nominee] 

Book by Dick Vosburgh

 1980 Best Original Score [nominee] 

Music by Frank Lazarus; Lyrics by Dick Vosburgh

 1980 Best Featured Actor in a Musical [nominee] 

David Garrison

winner 1980 Best Featured Actress in a Musical [winner] 

Priscilla Lopez

 1980 Best Scenic Design [nominee] 

Tony Walton

 1980 Best Lighting Design [nominee] 

Beverly Emmons

winner 1980 Best Choreography [winner] 

Tommy Tune

winner 1980 Best Choreography [winner] 

Thommie Walsh

 1980 Best Direction of a Musical [nominee] 

Tommy Tune

Drama Desk Award

 1980 Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical [nominee] 

Peggy Hewett

winner 1980 Outstanding Choreography [winner] 

Tommy Tune

Songs

music by Frank Lazarus; lyrics by Dick Vosburgh
(Unless otherwise noted)


ACT 1
Just Go to the Movies
(music by Jerry Herman; lyrics by Jerry Herman )
The Company
Famous Feet
I Love a Film Cliche
(music by Trevor Lyttleton and Frank Lazarus)
Nelson
(music by Jerry Herman; lyrics by Jerry Herman )
The Best in the World
(music by Jerry Herman; lyrics by Jerry Herman )
It All Comes Out of the Piano
(lyrics by Frank Lazarus and Dick Vosburgh)
Ain't We Got Fun
(lyrics by Gus Kahn and Raymond B. Egan)
Company
Too Marvelous for Words (from READY, WILLING AND ABLE film)
(lyrics by Johnny Mercer)
Company
(The) Japanese Sandman
(lyrics by Raymond B. Egan)
Company
On the Good Ship Lollipop (from BRIGHT EYES film)
(lyrics by Sidney Clare)
Company
Double Trouble (from THE BIG BROADCAST OF 1936 film)
(music by Richard A. Whiting and Ralph Rainger; lyrics by Leo Robin )
Company
Louise (from INNOCENTS OF PARIS film)
(lyrics by Leo Robin)
Company
Sleepy Time Gal
(music by Ange Lorenzo and Richard A. Whiting; lyrics by Raymond B. Egan and Joseph R. Alden )
Company
Beyond the Blue Horizon (from MONTE CARLO film)
(music by Richard A. Whiting and W. Franke Harling; lyrics by Leo Robin )
Company
Thanks for the Memory
(music by Ralph Rainger; lyrics by Leo Robin )
Another Memory
Doin' the Production Code
A Night in the UkraineCompany
ACT 2
Samovar the Lawyer
Just Like That
Again
A Duel! A Duel!
Natasha
A Night in the Ukraine (Reprise) Company

Reviews


New York Daily News: "Snazzy style and rhythm"

"A Night in the Ukraine," a touched-up London import that is the second and better half of last night's musical twin bill at the Golden, is the comedy the Marx Brothers didn't make, the one by Chekhov and Vosburgh instead of Kaufman and Ryskind. In an imperial red setting, as opposed to a Communist red one, Chico fingers the piano, Harpo strums the spokes of an upturned bike, and Groucho plays himself, only more so. The puns, like the feet in the first half (a pastiche entitled "A Day in Hollywood") have wings, and you'll leave the theater with the dizzy feeling of having witnessed a super, impossibly professional, senior-class spring show. Not a bad feeling, at all.

But first to that team of Chekhov and Vosburgh. "A Night in the Ukraine" plays fast and loose with Chekhov's three-character one-acter "The Bear," upgrading the pretty young widow to a statuesque middle-aged one: in short, Margaret Dumont, bearing the name Mrs. Pavlenko and played to haughty, gullible perfection by Peggy Hewett, an invaluable part of both halves of the show. Dick Vosburgh has transformed Chekhov's creditor into one of different sort, a Moscow shyster named Samovar. And, of course, there's a housemaid for Harpo (in the person of a bewigged and horn-honking Priscilla Lopez), to chase, along with a romantic couple (Stephen James and Kate Draper) patterned after Allan Jones and Kitty Carlisle, but with a seemingly endless "Again" for James to sing instead of his predecessor's "Alone." David Garrison's extraordinarily supple Groucho has his own nifty closing number, "Natasha," a serenade to the wealthy widow he wins. Frank Lazarus, who plays Chico, has composed the functional tunes to Vosburgh's lyrics.

"A Day in Hollywood" is, in addition to being a fitting curtain-raiser for "A Night in the Ukraine," a revue spoofing the Hollywood of the '30s. It is presented by six ushers and usherettes wearing natty Grauman's Chinese Theater uniforms. With Lazarus, who composed some of the key songs to Vosburgh's lyrics, again at the piano and singing a good deal of the time - too much of the time, because these excursions of his strike a distinctly amateurish note - the company performs entirely "in one," slipping in and out of a row of identical doors.

But the most striking section here is "Famous Feet" in which, along a narrow stage-wide panel at the top of the set, the dancing, scampering, sometimes floating lower limbs and hoofs of Garland, Astaire and Rogers, Mickey and Minnie Mouse, and countless others are captivatingly represented, and in continually changing leg-and-foot wear, by Niki Harris and Albert Stephenson (they're seen whole later along in "Ukraine"). This novel number was devised by Tommy Tune, who has staged the entire evening with style and rhythm.

The aforementioned Peggy Hewett is fun here, too, both playing Jeanette MacDonald singing to a cardboard cutout of Mountie Nelson Eddy in a Jerry Herman song called "Nelson" (Herman has contributed three numbers to the American version) and tootling a baritone sax through the melody of "On the Good Ship Lollipop" in a tribute to film composer Richard A. Whiting. The true Whiting high spots, however, are "Too Marvelous for Words," sung straight and appealingly by Draper, and the Bob Hope-Shirley Ross duet "Thanks for the Memory," done to a turn by Draper and James. The tutti closing number of this section is "Doin' the Production Code," in which the many amusing taboos of the industry during Will Hays' reign as censorship czar are spelled out in unison song and dance.

The American cast, from James' rangy, grinning juvenile to Priscilla Lopez' sultry usherette and subsequent pop-eyed Harpo, has been admirably chosen. And the backstage two-piano support to Lazarus' perfunctory playing is indispensable. The vividly contrasted sets were designed by Tony Walton and lighted by Beverly Emmons, while Michel Stuart is responsible for the snazzy and, in the case of the Marxes, thoughtfully disheveled costumes.

The evening, which you might say consists of two extended revue sketches with songs, wears thin at times. But it's a lark, on the whole, and, after all, who better than the Marx Brothers, and especially Groucho, could see us through the remainder of the year?


New York Daily News
05/02/1980

Replacement/Transfer Info


The following people are credited as replacements or additions if they were not credited on opening night.


John Golden Theatre

(5/1/1980 - 6/14/1980)

Cast

Jack Magradey
"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Sascha
a Manservant

Royale Theatre

(6/17/1980 - 9/27/1981)

Pianist: Paul Ford.

Cast

Brad Moranz
"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Serge B. Samovar
a Moscow Lawyer
Tudi Roach
"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Gino
Mrs. Pavlenko's Gardener
John Sloman
"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Constantine
a Coachman
Celia Tackaberry
"A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble
Mrs. Pavlenko
a Rich Widow

Standby: Brooks Baldwin (Carlo, Serge B. Samovar, "A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble), Mark Fotopoulos ("A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble, Serge B. Samovar), Mitchell Greenberg ("A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble, Carlo, Serge B. Samovar), Brad Moranz ("A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble, Serge B. Samovar).

Understudy: Elizabeth Hansen ("A Day in Hollywood" Ensemble, Mrs. Pavlenko).



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