Studio 54, (4/20/2006 - 6/25/2006)

First Preview: Mar 24, 2006
Opening Date: Apr 20, 2006
Closing Date: Jun 25, 2006
Total Previews: 32
Total Performances: 77

Category: Musical, Operetta, Revival, Broadway

Opening Night Production Staff

Theatre Owned / Operated by Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes: Artistic Director; Harold Wolpert: Managing Director; Julia C. Levy: Executive Director; Gene Feist: Founding Director)

Produced by Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes: Artistic Director; Harold Wolpert: Managing Director; Julia C. Levy: Executive Director; Gene Feist: Founding Director)

Music by Kurt Weill; Lyrics by Bertolt Brecht; Book by Bertolt Brecht; Based on "The Beggar's Opera" by John Gay; Based on the German translation by Elisabeth Hauptmann; New translation by Wallace Shawn; Original orchestrations by Kurt Weill; Musical Director: Kevin Stites; Associate Musical Dir.: Paul Raiman

Directed by Scott Elliott; Choreographed by Aszure Barton

Scenic Design by Derek McLane; Costume Design by Isaac Mizrahi; Lighting Design by Jason Lyons; Sound Design by Ken Travis; Hair and Wig Design by Paul Huntley; Associate Sound Design: Tony Smolenski IV; Make-Up Design by Chantel Miller

Roundabout General Manager: Sydney Beers; Company Manager: Nichole Larson

Production Stage Manager: Peter Hanson; Roundabout Technical Supervisor: Steve Beers; Stage Manager: Jon Krause

Musical Coordinator: John Miller; Conducted by Kevin Stites; Associate Conductor: Paul Raiman; Reeds: Eddie Salkin and Roger Rosenberg; Trumpets: Timothy Schadt and Matthew Peterson; Tenor Trombone: Johannes Pfannkuch; Cello and Accordion: Charles duChateau; Guitar, Hawaiian Guitar, Banjo, and Mandolin: Greg Utzig; Harmonium, Celeste, and Piano: Paul Raiman; Percussion/Drums: Charles Descarfino; String Bass: Richard Sarpola; Music Copying: Emily Grishman Music Preparation

Flying by Foy

Roundabout Director of Artistic Development / Casting: Jim Carnahan; Press Representative: Boneau / Bryan-Brown; Roundabout Director of Marketing: David B. Steffen; Advertising: The Eliran Murphy Group, Ltd.; Photographer: Joan Marcus; Roundabout Associate Artistic Director: Scott Ellis; Poster Design by Fraver

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Opening Night Cast

Alan CummingMacheath
Mack the Knife; head of a gang of crooks
Jim DaleMr. Peachum
Ana GasteyerMrs. Peachum
Cyndi LauperJenny
a whore
Nellie McKayPolly Peachum
daughter of Jonathan and Mrs. Peachum
Adam Alexi-MalleJacob
Ensemble
Terry BurrellReverend Kimball
Eunice
Ensemble
Brian ButterickBeggar
Beatrice
Ensemble
David CaleMatthew
Romain FrugéRobert
Ensemble
John HerreraSmith
a police constable
Christopher InnvarTiger Brown
Chief of London Police
Christopher KenneyBruno
Molly
a whore
Ensemble
Carlos LeonFiltch
Ensemble
Deborah LewVixen
Ensemble
Maureen MooreBetty
a whore
Walter
Ensemble
Brooke Sunny MoriberJimmy
Macheath's gang
Dolly
a whore
Ensemble
Kevin RennardEddie
Ensemble
Brian Charles RooneyLucy Brown
Brown's daughter
Lucas SteeleHarry
Velma
Ensemble

Swings: Nehal Joshi and Valisia Lekae Little

Understudies: Adam Alexi-Malle (Filch), Terry Burrell (Mrs. Peachum), David Cale (Mr. Peachum), Romain Frugé (Macheath), John Herrera (Tiger Brown), Maureen Moore (Jenny), Brooke Sunny Moriber (Polly Peachum) and Lucas Steele (Lucy Brown)

Awards and Nominations

Tony Award®

 2006 Best Revival of a Musical [nominee] 

Produced by Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes: Artistic Director; Harold Wolpert: Managing Director; Julia C. Levy: Executive Director; Gene Feist: Founding Director)

 2006 Best Featured Actor in a Musical [nominee] 

Jim Dale

Drama Desk Award

winner 2006 Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical [winner] 

Jim Dale

Theatre World

winner 2006 Award [recipient] 

Nellie McKay

Songs



ACT 1 Sung By
Song of the Extraordinary Crimes of Mac the Knife
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Jenny (a whore) and the Company
The "Rather Than" Song
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Mr. Peachum and Mrs. Peachum
Army Song
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Macheath (Mack the Knife; head of a gang of crooks), Tiger Brown (Chief of London Police), Polly Peachum (daughter of Jonathan and Mrs. Peachum) and the Gang
Wedding Song (Reprise)
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
The Gang
The "No" Song
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Polly Peachum (daughter of Jonathan and Mrs. Peachum)
Certain Things Make Our Life Impossible
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Mr. Peachum, Mrs. Peachum and Polly Peachum (daughter of Jonathan and Mrs. Peachum)
Goodbye
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Macheath (Mack the Knife; head of a gang of crooks)
Polly's Song
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Polly Peachum (daughter of Jonathan and Mrs. Peachum)
Peachum's Morning Hymn
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Mr. Peachum
Wedding Song
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Robert, Walter, Jacob and Gang
Wedding Song (Reprise)
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Robert, Walter, Jacob and Gang
Pirate Jenny
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Polly Peachum (Mr. and Mrs. Peachum's daughter)
Love Song
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Macheath (head of a gang of crooks) and Polly Peachum (Mr. and Mrs. Peachum's daughter)
ACT 2 Sung By
The Ballad of the Overwhelming Power of Sex
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Mrs. Peachum
The Ballad of the Pimp
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Macheath (Mack the Knife; head of a gang of crooks) and Jenny (a whore)
The Ballad of the Happy Life
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Macheath (Mack the Knife; head of a gang of crooks)
How Do Humans Live
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Macheath (Mack the Knife; head of a gang of crooks), Mrs. Peachum and Company
The Ballad of the Overwhelming Power of Sex (Reprise)
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Mrs. Peachum
The Song of Inadequacy of Human Striving
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Mr. Peachum
The Song of Inadequacy of Human Striving (Reprise)
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Mr. Peachum
Cry from the Grave
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Macheath (Mack the Knife; head of a gang of crooks)
The Ballad in which Macheath asks Everyone's Forgiveness
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Macheath (Mack the Knife; head of a gang of crooks)
Finale
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Company
Jealousy Duet
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Lucy Brown (Tiger Brown's daughter) and Polly Peachum (Mr. and Mrs. Peachum's daughter)
Solomon Song
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Jenny (a whore)
Lucy's Aria
(music by Kurt Weill; lyrics by Bertolt Brecht )
Lucy Brown (Tiger Brown's daughter)

Reviews


AP: "'Threepenny' Lengthy, Misguided"

It would be nice, perhaps, to get a little entertainment with our alienation. But there's not much to be found at Studio 54 where the Roundabout Theatre Company opened a strenuous, slow-moving revival of Bertolt Brecht- Kurt Weill's "The Threepenny Opera" on Thursday.

Things are kind of a drag -and not only because of frequent cast cross-dressing, most prominently by an actor named Brian Charles Rooney who plays the love-struck Lucy Brown. At one point, Rooney literally flaunts all his credentials in what could be the season's most unnecessary moment of overexposure.

But then excess seems to be the hallmark of this lengthy (nearly three hours), misguided production, with a coarse new translation by Wallace Shawn. The evening is under the guidance of director Scott Elliott who already has had one hit, "Abigail's Party," and one miss, "Barefoot in the Park," this season. Put "Threepenny" in the latter category.

The musical possesses one of those hypnotic scores, raw, jazzy melodies by Weill that unnerve as much as they satisfy. And Brecht's biting, bracing book, based on John Gay's "The Beggar's Opera," tells the scabrous tale of lowlifes in Victorian England as it rails against the capitalisticsystem and the oppression of the common man.

If there's a concept for this scattered production, it seems to have eluded the director and the performers. Even the set and costume designs are all over the map. Modern neon lights announce the musical's various locales.

The costumes, designed by Isaac Mizrahi, are eclectic, ranging from late 19th-century garb to outfits that would not have been out of place during Studio 54's disco days.

The actors seem to be stylistically playing in different shows. Some, most notably the marvelous Jim Dale, are better than others. The actor, too infrequently seen on stage, portrays Mr. Peachum, the opportunistic leader of the Soho underworld. His virginal daughter, Polly, marries the notorious criminal Mack the Knife, and Peachum is out to get Mack.

Dale has things down exactly right. Physically, he looks like a macabre vaudevillian, a creepy marionette who never stops moving. And verbally, he handles the often tongue-twisting lyrics and dialogue with ease. It's a magnetic performance.

The same can't be said for Alan Cumming's take on Mack the Knife, the musical's pivotal character. Sporting a Mohawk haircut and wearing basic black, the actor, while creepy and sexually provocative, doesn't register on the Richter scale of menace. He's provocateur-lite.

Ana Gasteyer, as Mrs. Peachum, seems to be channeling Carmela Soprano from the popular HBO television series and her strident singing voice often sounds seriously overmiked.

Nellie McKay's Polly finds another vocal role model, at least in her speaking voice: Judy Garland in "The Wizard of Oz." It's a bit disconcerting but the young woman does have a definite stage presence that could translate beyond her pop-music career.

A campy yet unfunny Cyndi Lauper, on the other hand, is largely wasted in the role of Pirate Jenny, the woman who sells out Mack to the authorities.

But then Elliott's staging is practically wit-free. The book's black humor disappears into a black hole of obviousness. Only in one scene, when Lucy Brown tries to poison her rival, Polly, with a large, roiling glass of gin, do laughs make an appearance.

Broadway's last revival of this classic show, the 1989 version starring Sting as a colorless Mack the Knife, was equally difficult to sit through. This "Threepenny" continues that depressing tradition.


AP
04/20/2006

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